Academics & Research

Students design and build remotely operated search bot

Scientists and engineers in various fields encounter different kinds of challenges and sometimes dangerous environments while trying to conduct research. Florida Tech electrical and computer engineering students created a remotely operated search bot that will help scientists conduct their research while staying out of harm’s way. The possibility of creating something simple yet versatile is what inspired Alejandro Peña-Pabón and Manuel…

Read More »

Doppler on Wheels Arrives on Florida Tech Campus

Students Chase Severe Weather with the ‘Biggest Dish on the Road’   Thanks to meteorology professor Steven Lazarus, Florida Institute of Technology students have a rare opportunity to chase lightning storms and fronts with the Doppler on Wheels (DOW) through Sept. 11.  Lazarus was awarded a National Science Foundation grant to bring the mobile radar, often referred to by weather geeks…

Read More »

Sloshed in Space

Studying the Behavior of Green Water on the International Space Station May Lead to Safer Rockets Robots and astronaut power are being used to churn, splash and slosh green water in microgravity aboard the International Space Station. Besides making really cool, gooey-looking waves inside clear, plastic capsules about the size of a two-liter soda bottle (the liquid is actually water dyed…

Read More »

Florida Tech Helps Georgia Aquarium Complete Dolphin Study in the Indian River Lagoon

Monitoring Marine Life Sentinels Dolphins are known to marine biologists as sentinel animals, if they are ailing, we humans may be next. The Indian River Lagoon, an ecologically diverse estuary that covers 40 percent of Florida’s east coast, is ailing.  The area is home to a large human population who live near its shores and plays a significant part in the…

Read More »

Florida Tech Helps Georgia Aquarium Complete Dolphin Study

The data collected from the dolphins by Assistant Professor Spencer Fire and others is expected to help researchers understand how toxic algal blooms can harm marine wildlife.

Read More »

Software engineering majors help stroke patients, with the stroke of a hand

Software Engineering Majors Find Inspiration  If you ever get frustrated using a stylus, imagine what someone with hand tremors feels like. Patients who have suffered a stroke often find texting very difficult and turn to a stylus. But as software engineering majors, Dominque Wehner and Kasey Powers, discovered there aren’t any styluses on the market that have the capability to…

Read More »

New Study from Florida Tech Finds Pacific Reef Growth Can Match Rising Sea

The coral reefs that have protected Pacific Islanders from storm waves for thousands of years could grow rapidly enough to keep up with escalating sea levels if ocean temperatures do not rise too quickly.

Read More »

Nutrients, Algal Blooms, and local waters

Today, the Marine & Environmental Science campers set up an experiment to observe the impact of nutrients on algal growth in the Indian River Lagoon.  After learning about the cause of excess nutrients entering the  Indian River Lagoon, campers developed hypotheses as to what might happen to algal growth. They then dosed beakers of Indian River Lagoon water with fertilizer.…

Read More »

Biochemistry major researches phytoremediation as a green solution to pollution

Phytoremediation to the Rescue Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding scientific discipline that focuses on the measurement and use of nanoparticles and plays an increasing role in modern life. Silver nanoparticles in particular have antimicrobial properties that are used in clothing to kill annoying or potentially harmful microorganisms. This double-edge technology also has the unintentional outcome of disrupting ecosystems when it…

Read More »

Marine biology major has snakes on the brain

A blind snake species, Ramphotyphlops Braminus, variously known as the brahminy blind snake, flowerpot snake and island blind snake lives mostly underground and is often mistaken for an earth worm. Among the scientific community, there is a well-known hypothesis that the eyes of these harmless snakes contains severely regressed retinas. Kathryn Gallman, a marine biology major, was intrigued by the…

Read More »
Back to top button
Close